Christian blogging.

As a reader and regularly banned peruser of  Christian blogs there is a trend that I noticed a while back, namely, the vast majority of Christian blogs I have come across generally attract so few comments that, if it weren’t for the atheists that visited their traffic would dwindle to well nigh zero.

Regular readers here will recall the thousands upon thousands of supposed subscribers a number of these Christians claim visit and/or subscribe to their blogs and yet one tends to see only a minute smattering of apparent subscribers who ever comment, and those that do have been doing so for ages. Much like my own readers. Almost the same old bunch of reprobates that I attracted from the beginning.

While I don’t always comment on blogs I subscribe to I will usually read most posts and those that I do read, I always click a ”like”  just as a ”shout out” ( of courtesy) to the writer to let them know their efforts have not gone unnoticed.

My question is: have any of you lot come across a Christian blog(s) that regularly attracts comments in the hundreds from a pool of these supposed thousands of subscribers?

 

Ark.

 

Covid 19 song de jour

 

 

 


105 thoughts on “Christian blogging.

  1. I think you’re on to something here Ark. And to add to your observation, I think these Christian Bloggers tend to comment at “non-Christian” blogs in order to be heard because of the lack of activity at their own sites. A good example of this is our old friend unkleE. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hello Mister Ken.
      Always nice to read your dulcet tones!

      Hope lockdown isn’t too bad in your neck of the woods?

      Unkle E’s place is Deadsville Central!

      And all of them are similar, which is why I was wondering if there are any Christian ”Star Bloggers” out there?
      Have you come across any?

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Good stuff.
    People are fickle. Follow/ unfollow because the topic of the day is not agreed upon.

    Today’s genius is tomorrow’s dunce.

    The amount of ‘numbers’ as to who follows is surely an arbitrary metric/ and one that is usually meaningless.

    Like you, I’m just happy like the pub owner who has faithful regulars to keep the doors open. 😉

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Agreed, but do you know of any Christian blogs that attract numbers that would suggest they match their claimed ”subscribers” or even posts that attract a few hundred comments on a regular basis?
      I get banned (eventually) on most Christian sites as most don’t like the awkward questions that require them to be brutally honest / truthful and once that happens I rarely visit, but when I do their place is usually like a ghost town.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. There’s probably a track just off ‘The Wall’ alone to suit any and every situation in life. Maybe Roger Waters spoke for all those abandoned Christian blogs when he penned this line:

        “Is there anybody…OUT THERE!”

        (‘Hey You’ is a fine song, by the way, one of the standouts from that album).

        Like

    1. I’m like you, Steve. Christian blogs have nothing to offer that interests me. As I’ve said so many times before … been there, done that … and have the t-shirt to prove it. Why in the world would I want to read their garbage? To re-live old memories? Hardly.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. ‘Why in the world would I want to read their garbage?’

        Really nan? You can’t find value in the goldmines of others, even though u may vehemently disagree, and even despise?

        I dare say, not one atheist worth his salt could accuse me of a site that only hosted garbage.

        Unlike you, I have said many times, I have atheist friends with whom I would trust with my wallet. Your description of others reveals more about your character, than theirs.

        I tell the truth nan, like it or not, but rest assured, many a trash heap emits the luscious odor of sandalwood, IF you look carefully.

        Like

        1. You’re projecting, CS.

          And no, I don’t find value in the “goldmines” of believers. It’s not a matter of whether I “vehemently disagree” or not, it’s more that their viewpoint is simply not worth my time. Those of us who have tried and rejected what is being “offered” already know all the platitudes and “truths” that are consistently reproduced by the devout and faithful.

          Like

  3. the vast majority of Christian blogs I have come across generally attract so few comments that, if it weren’t for the atheists that visited their traffic would dwindle to well nigh zero.

    They probably like it that way.

    Their problem is that they do not like disagreement, because they see that as challenging their faith. And you cannot have a good discussion if there is no disagreement.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. I would careful about drawing conclusions of viewers/followers based on the number of comments. I follow many sites, some unrelated to religion but still offering contentious viewpoints, where the comments are few but the number of viewers is many so at best the relationship between the number of comments and the number of viewers/followers is weakly correlated.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am referring specifically to WordPress. But would be interested if you know of such blogs on other platforms.
      How can a visitor (non blog owner) know how many views any particular blog receives?

      Like

      1. I have WordPress and both a public and private counter. Although I don’t participate, there are (were?) sites for ranking bogs based on number of visits. I also don’t know what if any effect emailing followers on each post has on this totals. WordPress can give me all kinds of info on these visitors – countries, viewing times, times spent on a page, effective of links, and so on – a running total I would think is standard no matter what host you’re using.

        The Sensuous Curmudgeon just today posted his numbers at well over 5 million individual and different visits (even though many of us visit repeatedly) but comments running around 2-2.5% of these potential commentators. So if you presume an industry standard around, say, 2% bother to leave a comment (and I have no clue what this may be in reality), then perhaps one might have the very rough correlation estimate on the number of actual visitors. The point is, I visit sites like Climate Denial Crock of the Week and see its material widely used elsewhere (and attributed) on all kinds of sites that either deal with or refer to evidence for climate change caused by people, yet there are perhaps 5 people who regularly comment, so I know the draw for visitors from around the world is way, way bigger than that. Although I have read and viewed thousands of the site’s posts and seen I think every video produced (many of the hundreds are award winning) – and have for many, many years – I have yet to comment and notice many posts receive no comments. Yet, sure enough, someone – usually a climate scientist Poobah – a few months later will make passing reference to such postings as if everyone knows whats’ being referenced. That’s why I say one might have no clue this was the case if the number of comments was used as the benchmark.

        Liked by 3 people

  5. None.

    I popped into Mel’s place the other week and it was as quiet as the cold vacuum of interstellar space. Post after post, hardly nothing but the odd scratched-record comment from Insanitybytes repeating the same thing over and over and over again.

    If I recall, Toms (Diner) blog used to get some traffic, but I was banned so I have no idea anymore.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. So about 2.7 Kelvin, then? Got to admit that’s still better than absolute zero.

      And though his church may be closed until further notice due to the C-19 outbreak, one can still feel the warmth of his love radiating out to us all the way from the plains of Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin.

      Liked by 4 people

      1. RON:

        “And though his church may be closed until further notice due to the C-19 outbreak” … that alone should resonate with rational folks. It doesn’t, but should.

        But to spell it out for our Religious folks out there—God is all wise, all loving, and (get this) all powerful, being the Creator and all that—yet He deliberately created covid (and tetanus, measles, leprosy, housemaid’s knee, broken legs, diphtheria, etc etc ad infinitem)?

        So again, spelling it out in case I’m still too subtle: your all-loving all-merciful Creator went ahead and deliberately invented these things, inserting them into a universe where there were none before?

        Nice. He gets my vote, I like an honest Spook; one that practises His holy sadism in full view.

        Let those with eyes to see and ears etc etc …

        Like

        1. Well, on the bright side they will now be live-streaming their services on YT.

          This week’s hymns include:

          What a Friend We Have in Google
          Turn Your Eyes Upon YouTube
          Just a Virtual Watch With Thee
          Livestream With Me
          I Come to the Chat Room Alone
          It is Well With My Troll

          Liked by 1 person

    2. Exactly John. As I mentioned below in my comment to Ark, Closed Canonicity of the Bible does not nurture or perpetuate exciting, creative, “authentic”(?) — i.e. God-breathed, God-inspired — new, cutting-edge exploration or new concepts within the religion/faith. After 1,900+ years EVERYTHING under the sun and moon has been told and taught over and over and over, ad nauseum. 🤢

      And yet, how many different denominations teaching non-stop ambiguity? 😄

      Liked by 4 people

        1. I do as well Zoe. 😉 In my opinion, it hasn’t stopped since at least 70 CE and DEFINITELY since 74 CE (the fall of Masada). Why?

          Many complex reasons, but the biggest reason is because by 74 CE Roman legions throughout Palestine had all but wiped out much/most of Homeland Sectarian Judaism—i.e. those many sects radically attached to strict Torah-obedient Judaism, including that of the ascetic (rural) Nazari/Nasari, or Nasara/Nazirites—and destroyed much of their sacred scriptures, save the Qumran Scrolls (Dead Sea Scrolls) and a few others.

          If it were not for these few recovered scrolls, evidence, etc, today we would not AT ALL know the real historically, contextual verified Yeshua bar Yosef and other Jewish sects of the late Second Temple Period, then even MORE of the world today would be Greco-Roman Christologists that emerged by the 3rd and 4th centuries. Why? Because the Roman Empire had as much to do with shaping the Western Hemisphere as Alexander the Great had and his Macedonian-Greek Empire. Modern Christianity (Christology) is practically 70% – 75% Greco-Roman inspired, if not more. It is very little what Yeshua’s actual religion, teachings, and beliefs were.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Careful Zoe! You’re going to rouse my critics and skeptics around here who watch me like hungry vultures waiting to pounce on me and my long, exhausting pedantic comments!!! 😄:P

            Liked by 1 person

          2. Nan’s going to kick me in the shins for sure Prof. 😉

            Just wanted to let you know. This information is the kind that I use to be very interested in especially re: political climate. I don’t bother with it anymore but when you comment I’m locked in remembering the good old days. 😀 It’s like my endorphins kick in. In that regard I will be careful too.

            Liked by 2 people

  6. I have noticed that Christian blogs attract few viewers and an incredibly low number of comments. As a matter of fact, right below this comment block advertised via MORE ON WORDPRESS.COM is a Christian blog titled “Bible’s Viewpoint: What Does It Mean to Be a True Christian.” Obviously as a result of the Key word “Christian” in your title.

    I clicked on the ad and went through posts all the way to the middle of January 2020. There are three posts a day and the average number of acknowledged viewers is 3 — with zero comments.

    In the “about” page, there’s a quick rundown on the publishing house with a request for money. And then a show case of books they publish. There is a pic of some unnamed guy with each post…who the hell is he?

    Maybe the whole thing is computer generated. The Christian Cloud! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  7. I remember brain-yawn had 20,000 followers but rarely had a comment unless it was one of us. I have about 900 and usually get 40-100 comments per post which is about 10% range?
    I think brain-yawn purchased his followers-pack from Bangladesh or somewhere to make him look big. All of them are a bore unless an atheist shows up. Mel, watchtower, all of them. Citizen Tom plugs away year after year for his own brain diddling Because nobody reads that shit.
    I do have a lot of vitamin salesman following now though I don’t know why. I can only eat one a day…

    Liked by 8 people

    1. I don’t spend much time on Christian blogs but he comes to mind. He gets less comments on his page than me sometimes, even though I have less than 200 followers. Mostly atheists visit his site, when he tries to rile us up now lol.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. I have over 1800 “followers” but who cares? The people that matter are the contributors and that count is considerably lower … but much more valuable!

      I think many “follow” because they’re newbies and that’s what WP tells them to do so they’ll get visitors to their blog.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. I agree. Really probably out of 900, 30-50 is the real deal that make it worth while. Occasionally I’ll have a newbie that likes 40-50 posts in about 2 minutes. Nothing like developing rapport. I’ve even had people beg to follow them. Weird

        Liked by 2 people

  8. I am about to throw myself under a bus…

    I am a Christian and I find most Christian blogs not useful. I must admit that I am disappointed in my own efforts at blogging. I like a different view and want to be challenged but it must be done peaceably. I follow Ark as I think we have some similar interests and I want his dissenting view. It strengthens my faith.

    It bothers me that I have been censored on atheist blogs, however, if Ark posts to my blog I would likely be forced to block him. Sorry.

    Like

    1. Strengthening faith by dismissing the arguments over and over is a good way to mature in the faith. In other words, lowering the bar makes it more palatable.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. KEVIN:

      who is forcing you to block anybody? Their truth may not be your truth but unfettered open discussion is still a good way to get to the nitty-gritty. Censorship declares the censor outright as both scared and a bully, no?

      Liked by 4 people

      1. It’s not a matter of truth but what is appropriate for the audience. My family reads my blog. Some people have a poor choice in language and/or subject matter.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I see your problem. I don’t know (never tried) if it’s possible to censor the naughty words out of a comment; but I believe that people show themselves and demonstrate their worth by how they communicate …

          Liked by 3 people

          1. And what the F&%$ is THAT supposed to F#$%&% mean you F&%$##”$”curmudgeonly old Kiwi ? Are you F&%$# “# suggesting I don’t F”#$%&/ know proper Inglish or summink?

            Liked by 2 people

          2. I mainly look at bad language as poor form but I am generally not offended. Unfortunately, some of my readers would be scandalized.

            Like

          3. If that is your only problem then … no problem.
            Of course a short list of what YOU consider to be bad language would be a good pointer.
            Seriously, you could read a hundred posts over here and you would likely only find enough words to count on one hand.
            But do give me some idea if only by using terms as …
            The eff word the b word etc.

            Liked by 1 person

      1. I hope I wouldn’t need to but I have a feeling that at some point the conversation would degrade into something my mother would not approve.

        Like

          1. Not even sure how to define that. You did call me a bleeping halfwit recently. It made me laugh but inappropriate nonetheless.

            Like

          2. So I could not comment your bog and call you a halfwit – presuming you deserved it of course?

            I read your post about your former eating disorder. Sounds physiological from your description. Glad you got it sorted
            I couldn’t see anything there that would warrant calling you a half wit, except maybe your misguided belief that Yahweh may have been upset that you were a fat git pigging put on burgers and wotnot.

            Like

  9. Probably not quite the same but several christian style nature blogs ( you know thing, all creatures great and small the lord god made them all) get a lot of ‘likes’ and comments. When I read “how great our creators creations” I bite my tongue and move right on along 🙄🥱

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Ron. I recognize one or two that have banned me. Warms the cockles of my heart! Perhaps I should work through the list and see how many I can get to blacklist me? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  10. The only two Christian-specific blogs I can remember that had regular comments and usual commentors are All Along the Watchtower, which Philip Augustine came from when I was posting my Saul the Apostate 5-part series. That Catholic(?) Christian blog or forum he came from was for “Christians” to discuss a variety of topics amongst themselves. The other blog was of course In My Father’s House, Pastor Mel Wild’s blog. Not at all an example of what you’re polling for. But neither of those blogs garner 30 regular followers and CERTAINLY not regular comments from those followers. Why do so few actually comment and engage?

    My educated guess why is simply because of God’s ordained command of Closed Canonicity. IOW, there is nothing more to be learned or explored from the classic 4th-century CE Canonical Greek New Testament because it never changes, adapts (anymore), or loses verses/passages. Imagine the uproar and riots if that were to take place. And some 1,900 years later because of Closed Canonicity we see the decay and distortion of even that original canon’s contents; never-ending ambiguity. Hence, some 40,000 denominations from 4 to 6 different primary traditions. The true diversity (confusion?) among the entire Christian faith-religion is sufficient enough to show why it is wiser to stick silently to your own little tribe of like-minded Believers and never pull back the Green Curtain (in Oz) or eat from the tree of Knowledge. 😈 😉

    One resource — https://www.pewforum.org/2011/12/19/global-christianity-exec/

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Watchtower’s pretty much shuttered now. I think they got grumpy with us heathens, and really, really grumpy with christian commenters like the dude in the hat (forget his name).

      Liked by 1 person

      1. No surprise. When there is nothing really new, really Earth-shattering excited happening—with a 1,900+ archaic fossil of an unchanged Canon and traditions—then it only leaves debates, dialogues, or further alienation with non-Christian readers/commentors. And all of us here in that Secular circle on WordPress know too well how they engage with us. If those heated discussions and revelations (pun intended) reinforce what average blog-browsers read but are too afraid to jump in and engage, then personally I WOULD ASK happily, rhetorically… Who is winning and progressing with ‘outside of the box’ learning, researching, exploration, and discoveries and changing the makeup of the religion and its declining numbers? 😁

        Can I please get an AMEN and a HALLELUJAH!!!? 😈 😛

        Liked by 1 person

          1. I agree Tildeb. 👍

            Those countries with a decent to adequate or outstanding (Secular) educational institutions for primary, secondary, under-grad, and post-grad studies over a VERY broad spectrum of fields and curriculums, especially sciences, mathematics, and fine arts, within developed or becoming well developed, e.g. Indonesia, Brasil, the less superstitious, less myth-dependent, and less stagnate mentally… over time (decade? 1-2 generations?) often become increasingly advanced, progressive, and Secular. This is very fortunate for humanity! 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          2. Yes, but religion is only a symptom, only one symptom; the illness is faith-based belief and we’re seeing that illness arise in some of its more acceptable forms: the most popular right now is belief in groups and the identities attached to them. Groups are not things; people are things and the base unit is the individual. The belief is that the individual will benefit more giving up autonomy to the groups to which the individual finds a shared identity and this mistake is as doomed to cause immense suffering to real people in real life as any other belief-based ideology that does not align with reality but is imposed on it.

            Make no mistake: this belief is as toxic as religion and just as pernicious in its current ideology of the social justice warrior. And it’s not just me noticing the profound similarities between the SJW and the Faithful, the belief-based ideology of the Woke with the ideology of the One True Faith. I’ve come across the same observation by people as varied as a Valerie Tarico to a Jordan Peterson.

            The same battle with faith continues in the form of political populism and we see the same dedication and doubling down by the Faithful to the uncritical support for the Populist… in this case Trump in the US. But he’s not alone; there are many populists rising to power as a direct response to the social ideology that has deeply affected western liberal secular democracies and turned many of their institutions into machines tom implement anti-individual, illiberal but oh-so-legal social policies. One need to look no further than the fascist gender-based transactivism undermining sex-based female rights in policies throughout the Western world and supported in law against legitimate criticism… criticism automatically classified by definition as blasphemy aka hate crime. Again and again, we see faith take its shape-shifting place as the constant enemy of secular liberal values.

            Faith is the enemy and we have our work cut out for us.

            Liked by 1 person

          3. Couldn’t of said it better Tildeb, mainly because I could’ve NEVER said it as concise and eloquent as you have Sir. 😛 All I can do is humbly nod and stay semi-silent and approving. Hahaha. 🙃👍🏼

            Liked by 1 person

          4. Christians like David Robertson and Mel love to wax lyrical how the legions of Christians are increasing very year.
            Overall stats confirm this. What disingenuous twats like them and others often fail to divulge is the majority of these new converts are from Africa and China.

            While the US might be regarded as an outlier, the real truth is that most Western countries are moving away from religious adherence and becoming more and more secular . This is the benchmark of where religion is headed and not countries where superstition still holds sway among many cultures.

            The simplest way I can put it is humanity is ”growing up” .
            Slowly, but growing up nevertheless.
            There will come a time when religious nonsense will be regarded as obnoxious, distasteful and something we are all glad we have shown the door.

            Liked by 2 people

  11. I do not frequent such plogish, boorish, places. I shall let you do that and inform me of your discoveries. I certainly give no rats ass how many likes, comments, or followers they get. I do wish they’d stay off the atheist channel.

    Regards, a reprobate reader/follower.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I like it when they get into the atheist channel … I even like the totally brainwashed, they are all the more fun because of their innocence.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. As in, after all is said and done with group-think belief in action, the individual is still the final destination for all social comparisons… even presuming intersectionality is a valid qualifier. In other words, group-based rights as a principle remains an incoherent legal description when one grasps that these assigned rights in action eventually have to pertain to the individuals who constitute its makeup.

      Like

  12. I started writing on my blog back in 2015. At that time, it was a Christian blog. I shared my frustrations with the way churches went about their business, but I still tried to do my part in spreading “the good news.” Back then, I got maybe a handful of likes and a comment here and there (the usual “Amen” or “Hallelujah”) from other believers, but nothing else. There was no dialogue, no back and forth in-depth discussions over scripture and no substance. It was discouraging to say the least. Once my faith began to waver and my writing shifted to discussing my shaken faith and then shifting completely into non-belief, people began to engage more. People had their own stories to share about deconversion, issues with the church and religion and everyday human dealings.

    Most of the Christian blogs I have come across have likes, but no comments. It’s all writing and reading for believers, but no interaction and discussion. It’s almost all preaching and no Q and A. When I have challenged believers on their blogs, I am more often than not met with minimal conversation that is filled with Bible quotes. They end with an “I’ll pray for you” and then the discussion is over.

    I did not intentionally lose my faith just to get likes or comments, it just happened. I guess when you start to behave like a human being, other human beings are drawn in to the conversation. When you behave like a robot that just keeps regurgitating the same tired message, other robots don’t seem to notice or care. They are too concerned with getting their message out. Having discussions/disagreements over it tends to take the focus off of the mission at hand and I find that most have no interest in real dialogue. Some do, and those are the ones I believe have real doubts. They may act defiant, but they are truly intrigued and they indulge atheists in order to find out a little bit more about themselves.

    Just my opinion.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. BEN (at 1815) —

      you weaken strong writing by inserting that apology at the end. Here you can say anything you like and if it is disagreed with your arguments/points may be gently (or otherwise) savaged but no-one will challenge your right to hold and/or state them.

      Okay, almost no-one … everybody has an exasperation point (certain God-ist flat-earthers come to mind) but anyone can still say whatever they like. Just be prepared to have your points held up to public scrutiny.

      The Brit First Sea Lord in WW1 famously stated: “Never explain, never apologise!” But he meant in the view of justification. (Anyway, good argument is its own justification, no?)

      Like

      1. Lucky for me I don’t worry too much about my writing being strong or weak, just open and honest. I write what I write and that’s it. If it’s strong, great. If it’s not, that’s okay. I am not overly concerned if it comes off this way or that. It is what it is. People are free to judge it any way they see fit….

        But I don’t have to agree with them. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

  13. Some of the best Christian blogs don’t allow comments, Ark,
    — see for example http://paulhelmsdeep.blogspot.com/ — and you have to take into account that that serves a different purpose from your own blog. When I was blogging myself — and that was a long time ago — discussions took place between bloggers rather than on comments pages and participation in that ‘community’ was quite rewarding. I didn’t have the technical savvy to set up a visitor counter and not knowing whether or not anyone was reading was quite discouraging.
    Yours,
    John/.

    Like

        1. Is this not a highly subjective view?
          And (without reading the link in question) what could one such as this offer that is actually worth reading? Can you be specific?

          Like

  14. Of course it’s a subjective view, Ark,
    and you may take it as a backhanded insult at many Christian blogs that are not worth reading IMO. (Many of the best Christian blogs do take comments of course, although there is a perceived need for moderation that you neither like nor appreciate.) Paul Helm is a philosopher who writes well but I put him up as an example because I can remember what his blog is called and because it’s very different to yours.
    Yours,
    John/.

    Like

    1. This doesn’t answer my question.
      Again, what can this blog offer that would make it worth reading as opposed to say Robertson’s blog, for example?

      Like

  15. Once again, Ark,
    suit yourself. Paul Helm is a Christian Philosopher who writes well so he’s worth reading if at all interested in well-written theology expressed philosophically. Not all blogs are about the comments.
    Yours,
    John/.

    Like

    1. Again …. aside from his ability as a writer (also often subjective) what makes the topic he writes about worth reading.
      In other words, what would I as an atheist get out of someone who writes about theology.

      Like

      1. Struggled long and hard to think of an answer, Ark,
        and the best I can come up with is the reason I read well-written stuff that I know I’m going to disagree with: to try and counter the Dunning-Kruger effect in me.
        Yours,
        John/.

        Like

  16. Again, ”well-written” is subjective.
    He is a Christian, therefore he is guided by faith. He considers he is a sinner and requires salvation, and thus builds his argument from this standpoint. I can read ”stupid” merely by clicking on any speech by Trump, why must I expend any extra energy with similar stupid merely because it is wrapped up in philosophy?

    And for you, it is obvious that, reading him to counter the Dunning-Kruger effect is having little or no positive results.

    Like

    1. To quote Dunning himself, Ark,
      — cut and pasted from Wikipedia —

      “If you’re incompetent, you can’t know you’re incompetent … The skills you need to produce a right answer are exactly the skills you need to recognize what a right answer is.”

      Yours,
      John/.

      Like

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