85 thoughts on “Lock down South Africa – Day 1

      1. Out of curiosity, to what extent are you house-bound? Can’t leave your house? Can’t leave your yard? Can’t leave for anything other than groceries and other necessities? Or can you go for a walk?

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        1. 3 .only. Can leave for groceries and other necessities, all of which have been gazetted.
          I spent 20 minutes walking round the garden this morning and will do so until the lockdown is lifted,.
          eg.
          Food – Yes
          Alcohol and cigarettes – No

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          1. Coffee and tea we can purchase.
            I just thank the god I don’t believe in I no longer smoke, and booze means nothing to me – even though I can easily raid my small wine collection if I become that desperate!

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          2. Wine shops should be open or at least should be able to deliver. I consider Gilbys medicine. Cigarette withdrawal for 21 days! That would make some people sick.

            Liked by 3 people

          3. In my smoking days I would have already stocked up. But what about those nicotine addicts who are only able to buy a packet at a time? For them, this is going to seem like Hell on Earth.

            Liked by 1 person

          4. Those are the people I worry most about but I think that’s where the black market exists. People often find ways to beat such systems though at very high cost

            Liked by 1 person

      2. I go for 6k walks whenever I can sneak past The Spouse. (Cerberus should be that vigilant!)

        But before you growl, we’re allowed to exercise here so long as tiny wee little groups and ‘sterile distancing’ (or whatever they call it) is observed. I think the permitted max is four people, but don’t quote me—my group is ever just moi.

        Circumstances are such that crossing the road to avoid others (should it ever happen) is easy. Too easy, never a nubile nymph exercising when you want one …

        But wrt the post above—people are people. We have to build around that …

        Liked by 2 people

    1. Police anywhere are much the same I guess.

      Organic bloody robots, too many of them … but hey, they are well paid (in kiwiland) for doing a tough job; and of necessity they develop a siege mentality.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. The garden makes the isolation bearable. We have had beautiful weather for the last few days, rare to be so dry in Cornwall in the Spring. Like you I am not venturing out except last night to clap for the NHS like thousands of others around the country. One of my dear friends now has the virus and I am afeared. Doing my best to find beautiful things in this, our 3rd week of self isolation.
    Stay safe Dear Ark. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Redruth in Cornwall was my birth place. I have driven through it once about 20 years ago. I left the UK when I was 4 years old for New Zealand so I do not really have much of a connection, however I will get to have another look one day if we are ever allowed out to play.

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        1. We first lived a short time in Wellington, then a short time in Cashmere in Christchurch when it had dirt roads, the old man had a car called a “Rugby” that had plastic windows, probably named to sell it to gullible Kiwis. We shifted to Auckland’s North Shore and a suburb called Birkdale in the early 60’s and that is where I lived with family apart from overseas excursions for over 40 years before coming to Australia. Thanks Argus for allowing my reminiscing rant.

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          1. You wouldn’t recognise any of it now. Even the beaches have changed—Cheltenham for example is now lovely sand, in my time it was shattered shells where sloping down and mud from when it levelled out. O tempora, o mores!

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          2. Now that you mention it I remember going to a muddy beach, that was in stark contrast to the Narrow Neck and Takapuna beach’s on Auckland’s North Shore.

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          3. If you live in that area you would know more about it than me and the Narrow Neck and Takapuna beaches, but we did actually rent a house there in the early days while the house was built in Birkdale. I spent a lot of money as a young man in the Mon desir Hotel in Takapuna that has since been demolished and replaced by apartments.

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    1. The shops you mentioned can do delivery and take-out here … but no personal visits. Most all restaurants are closed and offering the same services.

      Interesting the way different states are handling this. I would think WA would be stricter than OR since you have more confirmed cases.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Aren’t “Rocky Mountain High” and “Rocky Mountain Way” the state (and provincial) anthems along the entire Pacific coast? 🙂

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          1. Maybe I’m revealing too much. I remember as a kid seeing that in Butch Cassidy and the bicycle scene with Paul Newman. I stayed right there I guess.

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          2. I grew up on TV westerns and movies that focused on storytelling and character development rather than 3D special effects and non-stop explosions. I’ve pretty much given up on Hollywood now and turned to short films by unknowns on YouTube. The last movie I saw in a theatre was “Bohemian Rhapsody” and the last one before that was “The Martian”.

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          3. I feel the same way. The special effects can only be so cool for so long. I have a buddy that was interviewing filmmakers at Sundance last month. He started this podcast a while back and really had some amazing luck and Oscar winners fall in his lap (with a lot of effort, of course) but he is documenting how these producers achieve their dreams. It’s really well done too. https://www.dreampathpodcast.com/

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          4. When he started he had two interviews scheduled with unknown filmmakers for after the oscars (they both won) and the next days he had interviews that really launched his own dreams. Pretty cool story

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          1. Yeah on your earlier comment, I have given Hollywood the sidestep lately on Netflix, as these foreign films and series seem to be much better and more realistic, I watched “Caliphate” series last week that was made by the Swiss I think and very realistic.

            Liked by 2 people

  2. The Mayor had to completely shut down our city parks in Chicago y-day, cops are patrolling them now, because thousands of idiots were gathering in YUGE groups having cookout and shit even though they knew damn well they were asked NOT to do such a thing and to stay 6 feet away from each other. Yep. Nobs.

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      1. I think the multi-jurisdictional aspect of Canada gives a bit of latitude how the principle of doing one’s part not only for one’s self but for the general good like self isolation can be best achieved. And I think the governments have done an astounding job getting the population on board so that there is a very strong sense that we’re in this together, that government is working hard on our behalf doing what it can to help and support everyone, and that we have the means and will to see it through as a ‘We’ and not a ‘Me’.

        Where necessary, government has in place the power and enforcement to make mandatory close and/or disperse orders that can be given and people know can be enforced; however, the social power of shaming those who act contrary to the principle is mostly sufficient. Few people want to stand up and publicly declare themselves to be covidiots and uncaring about their duties to family, friends, co-workers, and neighhbours. To achieve this has been a work in progress with measured steps and good explanations why it’s important for one’s self and others.

        Nobody cares much if individuals go to some variety store/ gas bar/smoke shop’ liquor outlet/pharmacy/grocery store, whatever, and buys something they feel they need as long as they disinfect, wash hands, keep their distance, and so on. Do their part for themselves and others. Most stores here allow one to ‘tap’ a credit card or have it scanned with no personal contact whatsoever. Our grocery stores are well organized to keep people physically separated and lined up peacefully, protecting both staff and customers. Plexiglas at checkout counters to divide customers from staff with a physical barrier has been widely installed almost overnight. Many stores and business have had to shut down because what they sell does not match the risk of contagion they present when operating. But there are also many exceptions.

        Provincial liquor stores remain open but with these measures in place. Every cart handle and basket used for larger food stores is disinfected, and the local Costco operates like a machine letting people in under a firm count to make sure enough personal space is available. Most stores limit certain popular products per customer. The policy for the safety of everyone is to have little if any physical contact with staff, and so on. Places do business but the new normal is expected.

        No one I know is under any kind of duress meeting their personal needs whatever they may be, especially knowing ahead of time what to expect. People make allowances for these trade-offs and go about their private business without hassle if they are following the common rules. Shortages have been restocked. Products are available. Trust that everyone is looking out for everyone else is high.

        Of course people are going to break curfews if it doesn’t make good sense; of course people are going to go out and get what they need. Of course heavy-handed policing is required when they are asked to enforce the law that people feel they can and should break. But it goes a very long way to prepare the ground ahead of time and so wise political leadership based on medical advice and effective psychology is the essential ingredient combined with smart policies and meaningful support. This is why I say I feel extraordinarily fortunate to be Canadian going through this pandemic because I think my situation is rare in the world.

        By the way, I just received an Amber alert on my cell phone – meaning an important public appeal – to go straight into self-isolation for the next 14 days if I have just returned from outside the country. This alert goes to every cell phone in the province I’m in and just another example of how government is doing everything it can to avoid having to use police to enforce these mandatory changes by asking, teaching, and urging Canadians in all ways possible to do their part to help everyone while they work hard to try to help us through this period of disruption.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I think lockdown in Wenlock is easier to do than in most places. We can still go to the Gaskell Field and the allotment as long as social distance is kept. The 2 indoor veggie markets are only admitting 2 shoppers at a time, but the garage supermarket only asks you to keep your distance at the check-out. The lockdown reasoning is based on epidemiological modelling, and some of the modelling is coming unpicked, as in over-estimation of hazard. One model predicts UK peak in the next 9 days, but that it should be manageable. Another reckons half the population has been exposed since January/has had it, and thus gained some immunity. A watch this space sort of situation then. In the meantime, the world is a much a quieter place and social distancing is probably a wise precaution..

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    1. Meantime, Boris gets it …

      I am just concerned for my folks who are in their eighties. They MUST stay home. One of my nephews is shopping for them if need be. It’s not that they aren’t reasonably fit and active – they walk every day – but of they catch it …that is the danger.
      And the siblings are in Australia, France and me down here.

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      1. If they are fit, and keep themselves apart, they should be fine. I know it’s a huge worry when you’re all so far away. The media headlines are being delivered without statistical context. You can look here: http://www.euromomo.eu/
        If you scroll down to the weekly score across European nations, you can see the red median line, (i.e. the national average). If you look to far right which is week 12, 2020 you can see that in most countries the fatality rate is either around the median or even below it!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I am not paranoid about this, but realistic. Obviously if anything serious were to develop, my sister who’s in France would be the first on a plane, if and this is the BIG if, she was allowed to travel.
          There are, however, only so many bases one can cover so I trust in their commonsense approach and keep in touch on a regular basis.

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  4. I think I’ve got it … arrest everybody and herd ’em into little mobile concentration camps for bugs … serves ’em right anyway! There, that’ll show ’em!

    (But does it ever?)

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      1. My teecher sez just AnotHer week and I zhould be abble. Inn the meentyme Im’ to giv you a Like, ‘cos Ime nice like that. (She sez.)

        Liked by 1 person

    1. No need to apologize.

      The prescribed comment policy on all social media is to:

      – read the title,
      – post your comment,
      – attack anyone with an opposing viewpoint,
      – double down and start a flame war.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. There has been a very good silver-lining for me Ark during this Lock-down! 😁 My attention-span for reading, studying, and researching in-depth subjects I’ve been putting off the last 3-4 years has all grown EXPONENTIALLY!!! I can sit totally still for 2-3 hours non-stop totally focused (again) on fascinating subjects and exposés!

    I just finished reading Brian Greene’s The Fabric of the Cosmos (on String Theory) and I’m 62% thru Tim Samuels’ fine book Future Man: How to Evolve and Thrive in the Age of Trump, Mansplaining, #MeToo. I mean, I feel like I can once again read blog-posts that 10k – 20k words long or listen to Chopin, Beethoven, Debussy, and Satie for 10 or 14-hours straight!!!! It is so LOVELY!!! 😍

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Ark, a dear friend of mine shared this outstanding satirical video with me. Everyone MUST watch this hilariously true news snip-it! 🤣

      Well, many minutes later I’ve discovered that WordPress and Facebook have a spat, customer-retention/revenue-retention fighting… so I must type in the link covertly, secretly, to avoid these two childish brats from fighting. Hopefully you can see it in SA Ark:

      https://www [dot] facebook [dot] com/828542928/posts/10158162553502929/?d=n

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    2. I’ve just finished See Spot Run and am on chapter three of Famous Five Have an Adventure.
      Thrilling stuff, let me tell you!
      The last time I read Enid Blyton I was 10 and was so engrossed in a book on the way home from school that I walked into a lamppost. and cracked my glasses.

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      1. Yes. It seems I am finding LOTS of time to smell the roses (from my own candle scents), watch the family of Red Shouldered Hawks fly around us (from inside thru my windows), and talk live on the phone with several friends (while home in the recliner, couch, or in bed), and a few specific very close, intimate Ladies too discussing and imagining…

        Well, I better stop there because Ark’s granny is likely reading this blog a lot more than usual. 😈 I’ll just leave the rest to all of you all’s fine, twisted, perverted, vivid imaginations… out of respect for Ark’s grandmother. But certainly not Ark! 😉

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          1. Is it Carmen? Was I mistaken that it is/was April 1st… on that infamous day-one of what a custom calls for hoaxes, tricks, practical jokes, and good-humored lying? Oh what’s the day called again? It escapes me at the moment… 🤭

            Liked by 1 person

  6. Possibly a misinterpretable comment … I wonder how the ladies are getting on, the ones who hang the red lantern in the door-flap of their tent and offer hospitality to all comers?

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