Ready Steady …. Grow!

Potatoes. Looking good and soon be ready to dig up.

Chillis. I forget the name of this one, but it is one of about six or seven types I have managed to grow.

I have a new crop of seedlings of all types already under way in the shed and have been planting more seeds every day this week. I want to see  how many I can grow before the cold arrives! (I won’t divulge the target I’m aiming for but if successful I shall post photos in a month or two. )

Granadilla vine beginning to creep up the east wall. We’ve had more requests for granadilla cakes this year so I’ve seeded a dozen more vines across various parts of the garden, and I have planted a few seeds in pots in the shed.

We’ll see which turns out the best.

It also makes a delicious cool drink. You may know it as passion fruit.

Orange pepper. I cannot remember planting this one or where the pepper came from, so I’m interested to see what it looks/tastes like when it’s fully ripe.

These two are the only fruit produced so far so I will definitely be nabbing one for seeds.

Young Potato in a pot by the pool. This is one of three, small sliver of seed potato I planted a couple of weeks ago.

I have since planted a further dozen similar seed potatoes as part of my ”mission” to grow enough taters to feed us.

So far so good …. ”When the chips are down …. send for Mr Spud, upward and onward!”

Tomato Seedlings by the pond. These are late-ish plantings the missus started in bags, but they didn’t look too healthy so I moved them. I’m hoping there’s enough warmth for them to fully grow and produce fruit.

Recently transplanted young Lemon Tree / this one self-seeded from old lemons buried as compost. I’ll plant this one at the front of the house a bit later in the year.

After witnessing the annihilation of my previous crop of cabbages by the hens I made a couple of raised beds, added a shade cloth, threw a few cabbage seeds in and crossed fingers.  So when I saw this little one this afternoon during a wander up the garden I was smiling all the way back to the house!

The last of the previous season’s crop of lemons and bitter oranges were picked two weeks ago, most of which were juiced and frozen,  but by then the trees were already displaying an abundance of healthy new fruit. A couple of months and we will be ”back in business” and the trees will be yellow and orange once again.

Potatoes and Squash. Both from buried compost matter. There are some Gem Squash behind this that will soon be ready for harvesting.

I also picked a small handful of beans which we ate for dinner this evening. And while the others had steak, I had ”home-grown” boiled eggs!

Truly, there is nothing quite like growing your own fruit and veg.

Ark

38 comments

  1. Nice post, Ark.

    Truly, there is nothing quite like growing your own fruit and veg.”

    I couldn’t agree more. A little over 2 decades ago, I moved into a brand new duplex. The landlords/property owners lived next door. The couple had two small children. At this point, they hadn’t put up a fence dividing the two backyards. I had planted a lovely garden of veggies and my tomatoes were plentiful on the vine but had not ripened.

    I got a knock at the door and it was my landlord holding a bucketful of various sizes of green tomatoes. He handed them to me, quite embarrassed and apologetic and said one of his daughters picked them off my vines (every one of them). Fortunately, a fence was in place by the following growing season.

    I ended up making a lot of chutney, Salsa Verdi and fried green tomatoes. 😂

    Liked by 2 people

  2. very impressive. (I had to give up on most gardening some years ago, the back said, “you must be joking!” and the knees said, “you want me to do what? ” So i’ve left what I can’t fix to the birds and the deer. )

    One thing that helps is mulch, (less watering, less weeding), another, especially for the nightshade family, is regular doses of a combination of crushed calcium, magnesium, and Iron pills. I crunch it all up with a mortar and pestle and give each plant about a fat tablespoon, once a week or so. It doesn’t hurt to put a Tablespoon of this in each seedling hole, either.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I too have to be cautious at times to avoid any ”swashbuckling” when it comes to wielding a garden spade.
      I shall take note of your tips when planting out my next batch of whatever seeds sprout first.
      As you say, Judy, can’t hurt to have a go.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I can get down, okay, but the “getting up” part requires helpers. The knees just don’t work that way now. I love growing potatoes, and if you do it right the little pig potatoes make perfect ‘next year’ potatoes. Pretty soon you have your own hybrid.

        Liked by 2 people

        • I hear you on the getting back up.

          Raised beds are your friend. Or growing bags with those flap trapdoor things placed on a raised surface like and
          old table or similar.
          No digging and almost guaranteed weed free.

          Like

  3. Very impressive Sir! I don’t ‘do’ veggie gardening my old man used to say “Blast bor u carnt eat flowers” He grew the best new spuds ever, I’ve never tasted anything as good since. The secret? well rotted cow muck. we had a small holding about a mile from home complete with our own cow. Every year he would get barrow loads of this wondrous ingredient to our garden and dig it in. Times were hard back then.

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  4. My other-half fancies himself a garden person and when Spring rolls around in this part of the world, he intends to make use of the planter boxes that came with our new-ish home. Knowing his proclivity for procrastination, I’m not holding my breath. 🙃

    Liked by 2 people

  5. You have got very green fingers, Ark. Everything looks healthy and strong. I remember trying to grow potatoes in England when we were just married. Our small garden was almost solid clay and the spuds were very much smaller when we dug them up than when we planted them.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. That is a fabulous garden Ark! Well done. It all looks well tended, the passion fruit especially! Wow! You have a knack for it I think. 🙂

    I haven’t had near as much luck with my chili peppers as I have with my herbs/spices. But my Giant Passiflora quadrangularis fruit is doing remarkably well. I have some images of it if you’d like me to post them here?

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Very nice. Truth be told, I am a bit jealous. We’re still in Winter here for a while more. Yesterday and today were quite mild and we got a chance to watch much of the snow and ice melt away. But the next two days coming up will bring more snow and ice. It was nice to catch a glimpse of spring weather, but I have to just wait out this miserable season of Winter.

    Your photos make me smile because they capture the peace and beauty I look forward to in the coming months. Keep them coming.

    Liked by 3 people

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